Cube Redo

February 3, 2009 at 9:35 am (Projects) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

I have had this little storage cube since I was a kid.  When new, it had a unicorn and a rainbow on it.  Recently I redid the look of the cube so that it could be used in our home.  I forgot all about the cube project until yesterday.  There was a question posed on Apartment Therapy about recommendations for redoing a similar cube.  I thought that I would let you all know how I did the project, and although I do not have any before or durring pictures, I can show you how it turned out.  Here was the process:

1. I started by covering the picture areas of the cube with white contact paper.  I was lucky that the sides were the same width as the paper, but I did run short of paper at the top and had to piece two pieces together.  For a bigger box this is what you would have to do.  Not to worry, the seem barely shows once you get the paint on the paper.  Just try to line them up as exactly as possible.

2. Once the paper was on, I used an Exact-O knife to cut the contact paper around any hardware or latches.  This worked well and really didn’t cause any problems as long as you work slowly and patiently.

3. After the paper was laid and cut, I painted it.  I picked a dark red, and simply used wall paint from the hardware store and applied with a regular brush.  I recommend this, as it was easy and inexpensive.  I personally wanted an antiqued look to go with the worn metal hardware, so I only applied one coat and left it a bit streaky.  If you want a smooth, more flawless finish, I think two coats would do the trick just fine.

4. To add a personal touch I used a foam stamp.  I found this stamp at the hardware store on sale for about 50 cents.  While the paint was still wet I pressed the dry stamp into it in a pattern I liked.  When you raise the stamp it takes some of the paint off, leaving a lighter area for the design.  I used a circular design that went with the antiqued look.

Viola!  Finished!  It really was that simple.  Now this cube serves as storage for blankets in our living room.  And, this has stood up to some use and abuse and even relocating a few times.  It has a few small scratches in it now, but that seems to add to it’s antiqued character.  If you want yours to stay looking new try using a protective clear coat on top.  Here’s what ours looks like:

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Some foam stamps similar to mine can be find at http://www.makingmemories.com and other scrap-booking websites.

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Have fun!

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eHow To The Rescue

January 8, 2009 at 10:14 am (Projects) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

My grandmother gave me a tiny cast iron skillet the other day.  I know that these pans are much sought after, but have never owned one.  Although this one is just a baby she said you could use it for an egg or just to hang on the wall.  So, I was going to do both.  But, the skillet has some rust problems.  I know that you can removed rust from other metals using steel wool, but how to remove it from cast iron?  I looked it up on eHow.  I haven’t tried it yet, but they do have instrucitons for rust removal:

1. Depending on the pan’s size, pour 2 to 4 tbsp. salt into the middle of the pan. Add an equal amount of vegetable oil.
2. Scrub the pan vigorously with a folded paper towel, concentrating on the rusted spots but covering all surfaces with the oil and salt mixture. Add more salt or oil as needed.
3. For more serious rust spots, scrub with fine steel wool.
4. Wash the pan with dishwashing liquid and rinse well with hot water. Dry completely.
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This seems easy enough.  I will give it a try.  eHow also had instructions for “seasoning”  a cast iron skillet.  This will keep it rust-free and non-stick.  Who knew?  I will have to do this too:
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1. A well-seasoned cast-iron pan will resist rust and create a virtually nonstick surface for cooking. To season it, brush vegetable oil lightly over all its surfaces.
2. Heat the pan in an oven at 250 degF (120 degC) for 1 hour, recoating it with more oil after 30 minutes.
3.Wipe the pan well with paper towels and let it cool completely before using it.
4. To preserve this natural, protective coating, do not use soap when cleaning a seasoned pan. Instead, scrub it with salt and oil, rinse it with hot water, then dry it completely over low heat before storing it.
The full link is here: http://www.ehow.com/how_114309_remove-rust-cast.html.  Thanks eHow!  I will post before and after pictures of how this process works.  Here is the tiny little skillet:
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I Feel A Project Coming On

January 7, 2009 at 11:06 am (Inspiration) (, , , , , , , , , , , , )

I ran accross this oh-so-cute project this morning on the Curbly website.

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Even though this DIY serving tray isn’t my idea, I had to link you all with it.  I am most definitely going to make this my next project in the waiting.  I have been looking at trays and also thinking about how to make one.  But, with my love of all things black and white and my love of all things DIY, this is the winner.  Check out the full how-to and more photos here: http://www.curbly.com/DIY-Maven/posts/5902-How-to-Turn-an-Old-Cupboard-Door-into-a-Serving-Tray

Thank you for the idea DIY Maven!

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